Keep Off the Grass: A Reminder That Employers Must Address the Implications of Connecticut’s Legalization of Recreational Cannabis in the Workplace Before July 1

Keep Off the Grass: A Reminder That Employers Must Address the Implications of Connecticut’s Legalization of Recreational Cannabis in the Workplace Before July 1
CANNANNEW REPORT

Beginning July 1, 2022, Connecticut’s law legalizing the recreational use of cannabis for adults 21 and over imposes new restrictions on employers while offering protections for employees who indulge. While that might sound like a “green” light for employees to spark one up before work, there are concrete steps employers can take in advance of the effective date to avoid issues related to cannabis use in the workplace. Employers May Still Prohibit Cannabis Use at Work and During Work Time For starters, the new cannabis law makes clear that employers may continue to maintain drug free workplaces and may still prohibit employees from using or being under the influence of cannabis at work or during working time. As discussed below, however, the catch is that employers must have strong written workplace policies governing the use of cannabis, which must be communicated to employees in advance of July 1, 2022. New Employee Protections for Off-Duty and Non-Work Cannabis Use Connecticut’s recreational cannabis law also creates new employment protections for certain individuals who work for employers who use recreational cannabis off the clock, including current and prospective employees. For example, employers who are classified as “non-exempt” under the cannabis statute are prohibited from taking adverse action against a current employee solely on the basis of a positive test or off-duty cannabis use, unless such action is taken pursuant to a written drug-free workplace policy. The policy must be made available to each employee prior to the employer taking adverse action against the employee. Adverse action includes, but is not limited to, written or verbal discipline, demotion and termination of employment. In the pre-employment context, “non-exempt” employers may no longer refuse to hire a prospective candidate based solely on a positive cannabis test unless it would result in the employer violating a federal contract…

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Source : Keep Off the Grass: A Reminder That Employers Must Address the Implications of Connecticut’s Legalization of Recreational Cannabis in the Workplace Before July 1

reposted by Cannabis News World

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