How Light Wavelengths Affect Cannabinoid Production

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Lighting is a big subject within the cannabis growing world, with new technologies allowing cultivators to develop increasingly sophisticated illumination systems. By supplying plants with light from different regions of the colour spectrum, for instance, growers can manipulate the formation of flowers and boost the size of their buds. How different light wavelengths affect cannabinoid production, however, is something that is only now beginning to be explored. Related Post LED Vs HPS Lights: Which Are Best For Growing Cannabis Light Wavelengths And Plant Growth Before we get stuck into cannabinoids, it’s important to clear up a few basics regarding light wavelengths and cannabis. Visible light is just one part of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes the full range of radiation emitted by the sun. Gamma rays, X-rays and radio waves also feature on this spectrum, although these are of no concern to cannabis growers. The visible part of the spectrum itself is also split into different colours, each of which has its own wavelength. Blue light, for instance, has short wavelengths of between 380 and 490 nanometres, while red light has the longest wavelengths of 620 to 750 nanometres. Cannabinoids aside, these different wavelengths can have a pretty major effect on the growth of cannabis plants. In the summer, for instance, the high angle of the sun ensures that lots of blue light reaches the ground, which plants detect using receptors called cryptochromes. As the sun sets, though, red light predominates, and activates a different type of receptor called phytochromes. In this way, plants are able to recognise when the days begin to get shorter, signalling the start of autumn. For cannabis, this is the cue to begin flowering. More advanced growers often take advantage of this by supplying their plants with different wavelengths of light during different phases of…

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