Marijuana Advocates Raise Concern About Social Equity Problem In House-Passed Legalization Bill

MJ moment

The House passage of a bill to federally legalize marijuana this month marked a historic step forward for reform advocates. Yet amid the celebration, there are increasing concerns about certain language that was added to the legislation at the last minute that activists say undermines their social equity goals. Days before the floor vote, the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act was amended in the form of a House Rules Committee Print. While the main thrust of the bill remained intact, including a tax to fund programs to repair the harms of the drug war, a provision was added requiring a federal permit to operate a “cannabis enterprise”—along with restrictions that could ban people with prior marijuana convictions from being eligible. That runs counter to the principles of social equity that advocates have been pushing for, arguing that it’s not enough to simply end prohibition and that communities most impacted by the enforcement of the war on drugs need to be specifically uplifted in the newly legal market. There are some nuances to the language, but in general what it says is that, under federal regulations, a permit must be issued in order for certain marijuana businesses to operate. There are a series of considerations that go into a permit approval, but the one advocates view as the most problematic states that it can be suspended or revoked if a person has a past or current legal proceeding related to a felony violation of any state or federal cannabis law. That would raise questions about their ability to “maintain operations in compliance with this chapter,” the text of the bill says. It would not be an automatic revocation, however, as the government would need to “issue an order, stating the facts charged, citing such person to show cause why…

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Source : Marijuana Advocates Raise Concern About Social Equity Problem In House-Passed Legalization Bill

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