How the Cannabis Laws in India and Nepal are Changing

How the Cannabis Laws in India and Nepal are Changing

For 1,000 years or so, cannabis has been widely cultivated and consumed in South Asia, not only for medicine, food and fibre, but also for recreational and spiritual purposes, in the form of bhāṅg, caras and hashish. In some regions of the Himalayas you can still see cannabis growing wild and abundantly as far as the eye can see. According to a recent study by a German data firm (ABCD), out of 120 global cities, Delhi has the third highest consumption of cannabis in the world, ahead of Los Angeles, Chicago and London; Mumbai is sixth. In India, consumption is highest in Delhi and in the states of Uttar Pradesh, Punjab, Sikkim and Chhatisgarh. 31 million Indians were reported to have used a cannabis product in 2019. Cannabis is currently cultivated in 400 of India’s 670 districts (Acharjee 2020). Cannabis becomes illegal in Myanmar, India and Nepal Controls on possession of cannabis began in Burma (Myanmar) in the 1820s. In India, first in Berar, a system of taxation on cannabis was instituted in 1897, which raised a vast amount of money for the British Treasury (Mills 2012: 110, 130–136). The cultivation and sale of cannabis without a government licence was initially prohibited in the United Provinces in India in 1910 (Hasan 1975:237). In Nepal all licences for cultivation were rescinded in July 1973 (Fisher 1975:253). After a conference held in The Hague, cannabis first became illegal internationally in 1924 (Mills 2012; 2013). However, the restriction was not fully implemented in…

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Source : seedman
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