The Psychoactive Effects of Cannabis

The Psychoactive Effects of Cannabis

Even though cannabis has been periodically cultivated in Europe for various purposes—such as for rope, cloth and oil—for several millennia, interest in the psychoactive effects first properly developed in the West almost simultaneously, within a few decades, in France, Britain and the USA in the mid-19th century (Jay 2011:73–104). Early Western researchers occasionally observed that although someone under the influence may seem passive and as though asleep, their mind may nevertheless be racing with a thousand fantasies, dreaming but without sleeping, “un véritable état de rêve, mais de rêve sans sommeil!” (Moreau de Tours 1845:37). The general effects of cannabis Numerous studies of the effects of cannabis have been published since the mid-19th century. One of the most comprehensive of the modern era is the seminal study by Tart (1971); more recently, amongst many other publications, further pertinent observations and research on the effects are provided by Abel et al. (1973), Earlywine (2002:67–119; 2005) and Curran and Morgan (2016). These days the general effects of cannabis are, of course, generally well known. Familiar, common effects include less vivid dreams, an increase in appetite and thirst, hilarity, contentment, diminished short-term memory, enhanced imagination, slower reaction times to external stimuli, and occasionally difficulties—or probably just reluctance—in sustaining focus on a particular task. It is well known that cannabis has a mildly ‘psychedelic’ effect, with the consequence that the prevailing mood, inclination and disposition of the consumer are generally exaggerated or enhanced. Someone who feels psychotic, paranoid, sleepy or disinclined to work may…

Excerpt only …
READ MORE BELOW
Source : seedman
Link to original : The Psychoactive Effects of Cannabis
reposted by Cannabis News World

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.